POPULATION & ENVIRONMENT LINKAGES SERVICE
Freshwater


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National Library for the Environment

 

General Information
Freshwater Resources: Availability Pollution Biodiversity
Freshwater Systems: Lakes Rivers Groundwater/
Aquifers
Wetlands Watersheds
Freshwater Policies: Policies & Treaties Conflicts Management Systems
Regional Examples
Bibliography

 

Bibliographies provided by Cambridge Scientific Abstracts Environmental Route Net

How population affects the availability of fresh water for drinking, fishing, swimming and other uses; the aquatic ecosystems that provide these resources; the policy decisions and management actions that ameliorate the affects of population levels on the availability of fresh water; the affects of water resource availability on human population levels.

FRESHWATER RESOURCES Resources provided by the freshwater environment, including drinking water, fish and wildlife populations, flood control and recreational opportunities.

Availability: How population affects the availability of fresh water for drinking, fishing, swimming and other uses and how the availability of fresh water affects human population levels.

Pollution/Contamination: How population affects the quality of water through contamination and pollution and how water quality affects the ability to support human populations.

Biodiversity: How population affects the ability of aquatic ecosystems to support a natural variety of plants and animals and microorganisms and how the variety of life in rivers, lakes and streams affects people.

FRESHWATER SYSTEMS Water-dominated ecosystems, including rivers, lakes, streams, wetlands, watersheds, and groundwater aquifers.

Lakes: How population affects the water quality and life of lakes and ponds, and how the presence and quality of lakes effect people.

Rivers: How population affects the water quality and life of rivers and streams, and how presence and quality of rivers effect people.

Groundwater/Aquifers: Much of the world's drinking water is stored in porous rock under the surface known as aquifers. People can affect aquifers by withdrawing water faster than it can be replaced and by causing contamination. This section presents information on how population affects the availability and quality of groundwater for drinking, and how the availability of underground aquifers providing safe, clean drinking water affects human populations.

Wetlands: Wetlands are habitats that are flooded or saturated by water for at least some of the year. They include swamps, marshes, and bogs as well as other low lying areas where the presence of standing water changes the chemical and physical properties of the soil and may result in certain types of vegetation. Once regarded as disease-infested wastelands, it is now recognized that wetlands are extremely productive habitats that are very important to human life by filtering pollutants, absorbing floodwaters and providing spawning grounds. This section presents information on how population affects the water quality and life of wetlands, and how presence and quality of wetlands effect people.

Watersheds: Watersheds include all of the land and water that flows into a particular body of water, for example a river basin. They vary in size depending upon the body of water under consideration. Because of a shared geography and shared environmental conditions, watersheds are increasingly used as a unit of land planning. This section provides information on how population affects the water quality and life of watersheds and how the different watersheds provide resources for populations.

FRESHWATER MANAGEMENT: This section includes information on how people interact with freshwater systems and resources, including policy decisions and management actions.

Policies & Treaties: The various policy decisions on local, state, national and international levels that ameliorate the interaction between population and freshwater environments.

Conflicts: In some cases, the scarcity of high quality freshwater resources relative to human demand contributes to conflicts between people.

Management Systems: A variety of physical infrastructure and decision management systems are used to ameliorate the interaction between population and freshwater environments.

Regional Examples: Examples of localities where population is a factor related to freshwater resources.

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